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Search Results 0 to 49 of about 344 (some duplicates have been removed)
.s. as we work together, we can stamp hunger out. >> and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> for more information on tavis: please welcome at pbs.org. back to this program. -- please welcome wole soyinka back to the program. he is now a president -- a professor in residence, and he is the author of a new text, "of africa." >> thank you very much. tavis: you were tired of this nonsense that africans are inferior in a variety of ways. are we beyond that? >> i think it is an exaggeration to say that is why i wrote it. and number of reasons. it was to express my astonishment. it was totally mine blowing. i just mention that as one of the in ciliary -- one of the ancillary. i find a lot of crises tend to generate from east to west and cristian and islam. and there are what i call the invisible religions. lessons to teach the world. tavis: how do this to stand in their version religions play themselves out? >> yes, a very good question. look at somalia. look at more tanya. -- and more tanya -- look at another country. we would have thought africa is immune.
on the rise of christianity. then, join the discussion at pbs.org. n "from jesus to christ: the first christians" on is available on dvd. to order, visit shoppbs.org or call 1-800-play-pbs. >> frontline is made possible by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. and by the corporation for public broadcasting. major support for frontliis provided by the john d. and catherine t. macarthur foundation, committed to building a more just, verdant and peaceful world. more information is available at macfound.org. additional funding is provided by the park foundation, dedicated to heightening public awareness of critical issues. and by the frontline journalism fund, supporting investigative reporting and enterprise journalism. additional funding for this program was provided by the arthur vining davis foundations. >> you're watching pbs. available now from shoppbs they believed they could face any hardship, weather any storm, but nothing could prepare them for this. an epic saga of dreams buried and hopes reborn, the dust bowl. to order, visit shoppbs or you can do
pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. tavis: how about that? it is called detroit, a grinning when the -- a grammy-winning jazz artists. he worked with the late great miles davis. in just a bit, another special performance. marcus miller, i am delighted to see you. >> i know exactly what you mean. tavis: the last time we talked was on my radio program, and you took off to go to europe. i am at my house on line and a headline pops up that says marcus miller in fatal switzerland bus crash. i am at my house, and i screamed. i had just talked to you, i had seen you days prior. i could not believe you had died in a bus crash. the driver of the bus did die. what was going on in switzerland. >> we had just finished and monte carlo, the jazz festival. at the show, we had a long trek to holland. that is about 3:00, 4:00 in the morning. i am starting to come up, and i feel like it is vertigo. the impact causes the bus to fall on its side. from all the people here, crashing into people, it was pretty crazy. after a while, the rescue workers came and got us. the guy was like 23 years old,
the beginning. [ applause ] one tremendous thing about pbs is that it makes art accessible by putting it on a platform where millions of people can access it for free. and we need it. we need music, we need dance we need great theater -- for our soul for joy in our lives. a lot of people flip on pbs and hear or see something that wakes up that integral part of being a human being which is enjoying the arts of other human beings. so i'm grateful for pbs as an artist and as a viewer. ♪ who's produced over a quarter-century of the most entertaining and compelling portraits of the artists who shaped and defined the course of american culture? ♪ i want to be ♪ ♪ he wants to be ♪ ♪ i want to be ♪ ♪ he wants to be ♪ ♪ i want to be the greatest grandest ♪ ♪ and most fabulous producer in the world ♪ you guessed it -- "american masters." ♪ he wants to dine with a duchess and a duke ♪ do i get any money for this? ♪ i just gotta be a producer ♪ ♪ to learn more about the joffrey ballet and other american masters v
can stamp hunger out. >> and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. tavis: this year marks michael a best-'s 20th year as selling author. the latest novel in the harry bosch series is set in south l.a. during the riots in 1992. he is also up next year with a new documentary called "sound of redemption, the frank morgan project. hear a slight preview. ♪ ♪ >> i cannot think of frank morgan without thinking of redemption. as he recorded those things, he was making up for lost time, try to leave something behind that would inspire somebody or make their life better. tavis: we will get to "the black box." tell me about that black man, frank morgan. >> frank has a wonderful story. i got to know him a little before he passed away. he overcame a lot to make beautiful music. he was pretty well known within the jazz world, but i do not think enough people know his story. that was the impetus to try to put together a film about it. tavis: what is the story line that drives you to produce a documentary? >> he was the air apparent to charlie byrd parton. he w
. >> and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. tavis: pleased to welcome aimee mann but to this program. the songwriter has just wrapped up a nationwide tour. her most recent project is called "charmer." she is about to enter her 20th year as a solo artist. >> if startles me. tavis: a lot to get to tonight. first, some of the very funny video for the song "labrador." >> i really did not want to do this video. i thought it was a stupid idea. the directors seemed so incompetent that i thought i was being framed. >> aimee had so many ideas. we were talking back and forth. it was so collaborative. >> the director basically tricked me into signing a contract that gave him a total control. he put something in front of me to sign. he said it was a birthday card for his nephew. >> it is my pleasure to present to you the new video of aimee mann's "labrador." take it away. >> ♪ and i run when it drops when we first met i was glad to be your pet like a lab it was about half the truth you got mad and you go crazy and i came back for more and you laugh in my face cause i'm a la
together, we can stamp hunger out. >> and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. tavis: he is a professor of risk engineering at nyu's polytechnic institute and author of two best-selling texts. his latest is called "antifragile." nassim nicholas taleb joins us tonight from washington. professor, good to have you back on this program. >> thank you for inviting me. tavis: i want to get into the book. let me start with the news of the day. everybody in washington is talking about the fiscal cliff. the so-called fiscal cliff. they're not talking to each other at the moment. that is what the conversation is going to get to, how do we avoid going over the so-called fiscal cliff? you suggested that the fiscal cliff might be good. i got a chance to go through your book. i understand, i think, why you might feel that way. the book argues that we need disorder to develop. we need disorder in our world to develop. we will come back to the book in a moment. based upon the motion -- that notion, why might the fiscal cliff be a good thing? >> we have been stuck for four y
and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. once again, live from washington, moderator gwen ifill. gwen: good evening. its hard to believe, but weve been here before. first, negotiators pledge to work together then they test what the other side is willing to give. then they submit plans they know the other side will reject. and then, only then, a deal is struck. maybe, but not yet. and with every day that passes, congress and the white house edge close to raising taxes, cutting spending and sending the nation back into recession. here are the arguments -- >> the speaker's proposal right now is still out of balance. he talks about, for example, $800 billion worth of revenues but he says he will do that by lowering rates. when you look at the math, it does not work. >> this week we made a good-faith offer to avert the fiscal crisis and that offer included significant spending cuts and reforms and it included additional revenue and frankly, it was the balanced approach that the president's been asking for. now we need a response from the white house. we can't sit here and
in neighborhoods. learn more. >> and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. tavis: dr. linda bradley is the founder of a program aimed at women of color called celebrate sisterhood. i read a piece that you wrote: 10 ways to put your doctor at of business and i was fascinated by what i saw and i thought to ask you. whether or not doctors really want to be put up of business and you know where i am going. there is so much money that is made in the medical profession. i wonder not to cast a person -- aspersion on you but how serious are wary about getting to a point where people do not need hospitals, they do not need doctors. they do not need the kinds of medical insurance we have. can you imagine a time when we will get to a place where we will be so healthy that we can put doctors out of business? >> i am optimistic that we can do that. doctors would relish the opportunity to take care of patients, to be looking at preventive ways to promote health. if you look at the new oath we take, it is modified. but of the cleric oath says i prefer to take care of patients fo
hunger out. >> and by contributions to your pbs stations from viewers like you. thank you. tavis: always pleased to welcome anne lamott to the program. her latest project is called, i love this, "help, thanks, wow: the three essential prayers." i love the title. i love the book. i love the packaging. i love the layout. >> thank you. tavis: it packs a powerful punch. how're people responding to a run the country? >> great, but i brought to a little something, a present for you when your mother. i brought a present. this is for you. this is a cross that the children at st. andrew's presbyterian made. that is the star of bethlehem and the chute of jesse. we bake them in the oven. this is the burleigh one, the roses, the animating love of the universe. -- the girly one, the roses, the animating love of the universe. tavis: my mother watches this show every night. >> where did you put that across? tavis: i will bring it home for christmas, mom. ♪ i'll be home for christmas ♪ >> get over-excited. tavis: i do that. i want to get right into this. i wanted to just read a passage and let you t
hunger in the u.s. as we work together, we can stamp hunger out. pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. gregg allman is a grammy- winning entertainer. the allman brothers started by playing mostly are in the covers but went on to complete their own hits. the new book about his life is called "my cross to bear." is an honor to have you on the program. why did you choose that title? >> it was not so much to the title of the song, but it is hard to name a hound dog, so i tried and tried. i was going to call it "beyond the thrill, and that did not seem to perk up too many years. -- ears, and people started throwing me a bunch of names, and that one came around, and it kind of grows on you. a name has to -- tavis: sit with you for a while. i ask that because this is a tough book to read in the sense there has been so many ups and downs in your life and your career about which you were very why "mybout, but i aske cross to bare,"because it seems you have had to bear so many crosses -- bare so many crosses. you have had serious of stand- downs' in this life of yours. >> yes, but -- seriou
, the corporation for public broadcasting and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. once again live from washington, moderator gwen ifill. gwen: good evening. 2012 was a remarkable year one that was shaped by other exploration of america's essential divide, red vs. blue, yes. but also red vs. red. congress vs. the white house and when it came to foreign policy, whether and how to intervene. we begin, of course, with election 2012. >> thank you, new hampshire. tonight we made history. he is the worst republican in the country to put up against barack obama. >> if you've got a business, you didn't build that. >> president obama promised to begin to slow the rise of the oceans and to heal the planets. my promise is to help you and your family. >> when you pick up that ballot to vote, you will face the clearest choice of any time in a generation. >> there are 47% of the people who will vote for the president no matter what. 47% who are with him. >> i have just called president obama to congratulate him on his victory. >> and whether i earned your vote or not, i have lis
technologies foundation is proud to support to the contrary on pbs our foundation seeks to advance science education and further society's understanding of the life sciences including the impact of gee ownmics on the practice of medicine. >> and by sam's club. committed to small business and the spirit of the entrepreneur. and proud to support pbs's to the contrary with bonnie erbe. additional funding provided by... this week on a special edition of to the contrary, we take an indepth look at dna sequencing and how it's helping children with rare dna sequencing and how it's helping children with rare diseases. [♪] >> hello i'm bonnie erbe welcome to to the contrary a discussion of news and social trends from diverse perspectives. this week we show you how advances in dna sequencing are helping scientists find cures for rare diseases especially rare childhood diseases. dr. james lupski is a man with a mission as a pediatrician at baylor college of medicine in houston, dr. lupski has devoted much of his medical career to researching and treating children with rare diseases. >> the patients
by the anenburg foundation, the corporation for public broadcasting and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. once again, live from washington, moderator gwen ifill. gwen: good evening. perhaps you took a break for the holidays. perhaps you gave thanks that the election was ofrlte then you dialed back in this week and discovered, no, we have apparently just entered a new phase in a political year that never ended. two big stories this week -- the impending fiscal cliff and the washington debates over who will succeed hillary clinton as secretary of state. first to the fiscal cliff. at the end of the year the buescher ra tax cuts will expire and the first wave of $1.2 trillion in spending cuts is scheduled to kick in. c.e.o.'s and economists alike are worried this will send the economy spiraling back into recession. the solution, $1. trillion in new revenue, much to come from raising taxes on wealthy americans. >> if congress does nothing, every family in america will see their income taxes automatically go up on january 1. every family. everybody here, you'll see
in america really looks like, through their eyes. >> frontlinis made possible by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. and by the corporation for public broadcasting. major support for frontliis ovidedy thjohn. and catherine t. macarthur foundation, committed to building a more just, verdant and peaceful world. more information is available at macfound.org. additional funding is provided by the park foundation, dedicated to heightening public awareness of critical issues. and by the frontline journalism fund, with grants from jon and jo ann hagler, on behalf of the jon l. hagler foundation. and scott nathan and laura debonis. >> my name is brittany smith, and i'm nine years old. it's tough because my mom and dad are poor. my dad just lost his job. it's kind of hard for us. monday i tried getting in the shower, and it was cold. i put the hot on all the way and no cold, and it was freezing. it felt like shoving your face in a bunch of snow. it was freezing! the hot water shut off because we didn't pay the bill in time. it was overdue. >> so what's the next bill
foundation. the corporation for public broadcasting and by contributions to your pbs stations for viewers like you. thank you. once again, live from washington, moderator gwen ifill. gwen: good evening. if it seems like we have been here before, it's because we have. but this time the fatalities included 20 elementary school-aged children and 7 additional adults, including the shooter. shocking violence, innocent victims, expressions of outrage and from the president today, a promise to act. >> as a country we have been through this too many times, whether it's an elementary school in newtown or a shopping mall in oregon or a temple in wisconsin or a movie theater in aurora or a street corner in chicago, these neighborhoods are our neighborhoods and these children are our children. and we're going to have to come together and take meaningful action to prevent more tragedies like this, regardless of the politics. gwen: but what if anything can or will government do about it? the newtown shootings provide more fodder for a debate that interestingly enough we didn't even have in the 2012 pre
>> and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. tavis: pleased to welcome jamie lee curtis back to this program. the award-winning actor and best-selling author is out with her 10th new book for young readers. the latest is called "my brave year of firsts: tries, sighs and high fives." i love that title. but that's not the book. that's not the book cover. that's james taylor and me. >> you know what? you're taunting. this is taunting. this is actually certifiable taunting. you are taunting me. tavis: that's james taylor and tavis smiley. >> yes. i'm surprised you're not making out. tavis: so how about the book cover, guys? >> no, no, forget the book cover. let's see the after picture. tavis: there you go. there's the book cover. >> by the way, i now know why you're mr. smiley. tavis: why? oh, yeah, yeah. >> okay, what's your favorite james taylor song ever written? tavis: ooh, come on, come on. >> best james taylor song ever written? oh, come on, if you had asked me on the spot -- tavis: that changes every week. >> say if we had just switched the
by contributions to pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. tavis: please welcome kristin stewart to the story. -- to this program. and the latest edition to the "twilight" saga is in theaters. you can catch her next project, "on the road," starring viggo mortensen. >> i don't care. you're just going to leave me anyway. >> when are you going back to denver? >> i don't know. i do not know what i am going to do. i could go back to my fiancee. -- fiance. >> fiance? >> he has been away while. he is nice. >> that is good. >> i wish dean was not so crazy. >> you could wish that the rest of your life. >> i just want to have a baby. something normal. i really do want that. >> i just had a great idea. you guys are going to love it. tavis: the best part is whispering to the star while the clip was playing and what they thought about this scene. kristin says, "i love this part." >> i met my favorite part of sitting on a talk show is sitting in front of a big picture. tavis: i am sorry. you mean the best part of being on the show with the big screen behind you. >> life forever. >tavis: i got
, historic, it airs on pbs, which is why it's perhaps a bit of a shock that "downton abbey" is one of biggest hits on television these days. so how did a soap about fading aristocrats and their servants become so addictive to american audiences? abc's nick watt got a rare access to the set to find out. >> rolling, quiet, please. action. >> reporter: here we are behind the scenes of "downton abbey" filmed in a real castle, not a sound stage. >> you can come up. it's a girl. >> reporter: a sneak peek at the series about to hit your screens, perhaps the most unlikely smash hit on american tv. it's just so downright british. but it's a soap opera so soaked in history that even pseudo intellects confess their love of it. a blend of crumbling bricks, corsets, men dying in their own beds and englishness. >> of course. would happen to a foreigner. it's typical. >> don't be ridiculous. >> i'm not being ridiculous. no englishman would dream of dying in someone else's house. >> reporter: hugh bonnville plays the patriarch trying to marry off his three daughters the keep the estate in the family. >> you
in the u.s. as we work together, we can stamp hunger out. >> and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. tavis: what a pleasure it is to welcome mary wilson to this program. it has been 50 years since she and the other supremes came together. a new commemoratives publication is out. mary wilson, we will get to a but a little walk around -- down memory lane. love away,ow our baby ♪ o love ♪n the name ♪ before you break my heart, think it over ♪ way lifeions of the used to be ♪ ♪ in you i put all my faith and trust ♪ ♪ someday we'll be together ♪ go?by. where did our love you want me no more ♪ >> i love watching those. tavis: we were talking about they hear styles and the clothes. there was an exhibit that opens in january. >> at the african-american museum in philadelphia. tavis: are we going to see some of this on display? >> one of the evidence i was telling you was burned up in mexico city. -- of its i was telling you about was bird apply in mexico city. one was stolen. the ones i have been on exhibit. they have been on exhibit for eight
.s. >> and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. is first gained american attention for his series, "band of brothers." "homeland" is back for its much- anticipated second season. >> i would consider it an honor to work with the man who has lived among the enemy and understands them. what do you think? are you interested? >> yes. i am interested. france could news, good news. >> i need to talk to my wife and furs. >> is there a problem? >> to be -- to my wife first. >> is there a problem? >> there could be. >> i am sure you will be able to convince her. tavis: last night i am on the plane flying back to los angeles, and i am reading the issue of "the rolling stone." he kind of miss the mark. there were some things, but i gleaned in the article the president who says his favorite tv show is "homeland." >> and he spoke exclusively about how much he loves me. tavis: he said, i love "homeland." >> when i went to the white house, they went, maureen broke back. she was not supposed to, and she slipped into her article. the president was watching our show, and i asked him about it,
and background on the rise of christianity. then, join the discussion at pbs.org. n "from jesus to christ: the first christians" on is available on dvd. to order, visit shoppbs.org or call 1-800-play-pbs. >> frontline is made possible by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. and by the corporation for public broadcasting. major support for frontliis provided by the john d. and catherine t. macarthur foundation, committed to building a more just, verdant and peaceful world. more information is available at macfound.org. additional funding is provided by the park foundation, dedicated to heightening public awareness of critical issues. and by the frontline journalism fund, supporting investigative reporting and enterprise journalism. additional funding for this program was provided by the arthur vining davis foundations. >> you're watching pbs. available now from shoppbs they believed they could face any hardship, weather any storm, but nothing could prepare them for this. an epic saga of dreams buried and hopes reborn, the dust bowl. to order, visit shoppbs or
is made possible by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. and by the corporation for public broadcasting. major funding is provided by the john d. and catherine t. macarthur foundation. committed to building a more just, verdant, and peaceful world. and by reva and david logan. committed to investigative journalism as the guardian of the public interest. additional funding is provided by the park foundation. dedicated to heightening public awareness of critical issues. and by the frontline journalism fund. supporting investigative reporting and enterprise journalism. >> go to work, go to work, go to work, go to work, go to work. let's go! >> we got to use what we have. >> whoa! >> pick it up, boys! >> ...14, 15, 16, 17... ( whistle blows ) >> let's go, get there, get there. >> let's go, let's go, let's go, let's go, let's go, let's go. hey, tyler, get on up there, let's go. come on, let's go. ( whistle blows ) >> come on! >> come on, jacob! >> narrator: the summer of 2010 was one of the hottest on record in arkansas. >> you want to win or y
: that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: >> bnsf railway. >> support also comes from carnegie corporation of new york, a foundation created to do what andrew carnegie called "real and permanent good." celebrating 100 years of philanthropy at carnegie.org. >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and friends of the newshour. and... >> this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> brown: the remaking of the obama administration's foreign policy team began today as the president nominated massachusetts senator john kerry to replace hilary clinton as secretary of state. the former presidential candidate who lost to george w. bush in 2004 got the nod after u.n. ambassador susan rice withdrew her name. she'd faced republican criticisms over the benghazi terrorist attack. president obama made the announcement this afternoon at the white house. >> i am very proud to announce my choice for america'
by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. major funding is provided by the john d. and catherine t. macarthur foundation, committed to building a more just, verdant and peaceful world. more information is available at macfound.org. additional funding is provided by the park foundation, dedicated to heightening public awareness of critical issues. and by tfrontline journalism fund, supporting investigative reporting and enterprise journalism. major funding for this program is provided by the bill and melinda gates foundation. and by the corporation for public broadcasting and its american graduate initiative for "middle school moment." >> be good. >> i won't. >> yeah, i know. >> my ninth grade year was probably the worst because i was constantly being beaten up and, you know, jumped and everything. i was pretty much an outcast. constantly in the office, like, literally every day. there were jumpings. somebody at the school got stabbed with a protractor and that was, like, the first two or three weeks of school. >> tenth grade year, i was only at school for a mont
's >> brown: that's all ahead on tonight's "newshour." major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: ♪ ♪ moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. th and by the alfred p. sloan foundation. supporting science, technology, and improved economic performance and financial literacy in the 21st century. and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> woodruff: with 25 days left until the year-end fiscal cliff, and just 19 days until christmas, president obama warned lawmakers today not to add to the holiday pressures americans already feel, by letting the political stalemate drag on. but he also again insisted there would be no deal unless tax rates went up on the wealthy. >> the closer it gets to the brink, the more stressed we're going to be. >> woodruff: president obama made the short trip to northern virginia today to underline his plan to avert the fiscal cliff. at the home o
can download our new app in the itunes app store. i'll see you back here next time on pbs. until then, goodnight from l.a., thanks for watching and, as always, keep the faith. >> he knew the life he wanted. he knew what he had to do to get it. >> it's too different from anything you've ever done before. >> i have to tell you something. this is where it really gets interesting. >> for more information on today's show, visit tavis smiley at pbs.org. tavis: hi, i'm tavis smiley. join me next time for a conversation with after an author jamie lee curtis. that is next time. we will see you then. >> there is a saying that dr. king had that said there is right thing. i try to live my life every day by doing the right thing. we know that we are only halfway to completely eliminating hunger and we have work to do. walmart committed $2 billion to fighting hunger in the u.s. as we work together, we can stamp hunger out. >> and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> be more. pbs. captioning sponsored by macneil/lehrer productions >> ifill: there were calls for p
trafficking, statistics on the global sex trade. then join the discussion at pbs.org. >> next time: from egypt, inside the youth movement behind the uprising. >> the people want their freedom. they're not afraid anymore. >> and investigating the muslim brotherhood. "revolution in cairo," on the next special edition of frontline. >> this program is available on dvd to educators and educational institutions only. to order, visit shoppbs.org/education, or call 1-800-play-pbs. captioned by media access group at wgbh access.wgbh.org >> frontline is made possible by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. and by the corporation for public broadcasting. major funding is provided by the john d. and catherine t. macarthur foundation. committed to building a more just, verdant and peaceful world. and by reva and david logan. committed to investigative journalism as the guardian of the public interest. additional funding is provided by the park foundation. dedicated to heightening public awareness of critical issues. >> you're watching pbs. >>> the following is a co-production
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 344 (some duplicates have been removed)